What is known in English as a saute pan or Sautoir Pan is a broad shallow pan with straight edges, also known as a sautoir in French. Sauteing is what we would ordinarily refer to as pan-frying in this context. Heat causes water to escape from the components, causing it to jump and bounce about in the pan.

The Sautoir is a heavy pan with straight edges often used for cooking meat. That's because it's often used to prepare sauces and reductions, where the flat, heavy-bottom aids in the cooking process. The pot is ideal for cooking protein and preparing a pan sauce to go along with it.

Use of a sauté pan

With the sloping sides, you can easily make a rich roux for gumbo or an egg-based béchamel sauce for mac and cheese, and you can keep the polenta and risotto constantly stirring. In addition, the Sauteuse, which has a considerable depth, may be used to prepare chili, soups, and noodle meals such as Pan-Fried Noodles and Shrimp, among other things.

Difference Between a Sauté Pan and a Braising Pan

Several terms, such as brazier, casserole, sauteuse, and dutch oven, are used interchangeably in the same context. The names are applied in somewhat different ways by various manufacturers. According to a generalization, they are slightly wide, have a mid-height straight side, and have a sharp transition from the sidewall to the top of the lid. It will be more comprehensive and flared on one side, with a rounded transition to the sidewall, lower in height.

For example, these types of pans will result in somewhat reduced evaporation of liquids compared to a saute pan. Although they are best suited for wet cooking, they may also sear meat and sauté vegetables. And it would help if you did so to make the braise in one pan. However, while a saute pan may be used for comparable tasks, it is not big enough to accommodate a massive piece of meat since the wall is not tall enough. Furthermore, the covers of saute pans seldom fit as securely as they should.

A vast steak cooked in each pan would benefit from the steam generated by the brazier's closer, higher wall, contributing to some steaming effect on the steak. Compared to a saute pan, this may cause the crusting of the steak to become less crisp and the meat to get more thoroughly cooked. The degree to which the distinctions are noticeable and how easily they may be distinguished is debated. If all other factors are equal, the steak in the saute pan should be the preferable choice.

Each pan has a particular purpose, and although there are instances when you could substitute one pan for another, there are also situations when you shouldn't.

Best Sautoir Pan To Choose 

You can discover a list of some of the best sautoir pans in the section below. There are several different options available at various pricing points. The Best Buys are within reach of most people, so choose one that best meets your needs.

Mauviel M'Heritage 250B 2.5 mm 3.2 quart 9.4″/24 cm Copper Saute Pan & Lid, Bronze Handle

Mauviel is a major French manufacturer of copper cookware and is one of the largest in the world. Their cookware is made of copper that is 2.3 mm thick and is widely regarded as the finest in the business. It takes lesser time to heat up, and you get a better sear than the competitors. The only disadvantage is that the handle becomes heated and the price. It's like, gosh, that's pricey. In any case, if you want to be among the very best, this is the method to use.

All-Clad 6405 SS Copper Core 5-Ply (Best Fully Cladded Pan)

All-Clad was the first company to develop cladded cookware. Their copper core lines use copper while also providing the extra benefit of stainless steel, which is a unique combination. It is responsive and performs well. The only negative aspect is the terrible handle. However, if you want something lighter and more maneuverable, All-Clad is the way to go.

Calphalon Classic Nonstick Saute Pan with Cover, 5 Quart, Grey 

The Calphalon nonstick sautoir pan is a beautiful choice if you want something basic and straightforward to use. It includes a comfy grip and a glass cover so you can see what's within. On the other hand, the nonstick coating will wear away with time and usage. The good news is that if you are planning on braising your food, wearing down the nonstick coating will not be a significant concern. Additionally, it has been anodized for added durability.

Lodge Pre-Seasoned Cast Deep Skillet With Iron Cover and Assist Handle 

Although technically a skillet, this model is the most accurate replica of a cast-iron skillet available. There is a positive aspect to this in that it is hefty and retains heat effectively. This is the perfect item for searing and deep frying. The lid is both sturdy and long-lasting, in addition to being attractive. The one and only thing you need to be concerned about is the seasoning. Rust may occur if you mistakenly strip it of its protective coating.

Bottom Line 

When it comes to a Saute Pan, there are numerous alternatives available, and they are all fantastic for frying and braising food. Copper-based products, on the other hand, are the best. Mauviel is a decent alternative. However, they are somewhat pricey. Affordable options like those made by All-Clad are equally excellent, but they come at a high price. More economical models are often nonstick and perform well. Just keep in mind that they do become less effective with time. However, if you want an authentic nonstick experience, go for a cast-iron skillet.

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