Dalstrong Shogun Knives is the only contemporary knife manufacturing firm that has caused as much controversy as they have. Their commitment has been to produce knives in conventional and new designs, utilizing the same high-quality materials as their rivals since they first appeared on the market. Despite this, they’re selling their knives for meager costs, which has some knife aficionados doubting the quality of their products.

In terms of flash, this knife has a lot to offer: it has a fancy-looking pin in the handle, a Damascus blade with a mirror shine and hammer finish, a sizeable Dalstrong logo carved into the butt of the handle, and it comes packaged with a metal pin and around 30 pounds of promotional material.

Like other Dalstrong goods, the Shogun X is surrounded by a flurry of publicity that raises serious doubts about its ability to perform its intended role. However, it cuts well, has excellent edge holding, and is relatively light in weight.

Design 

The features of this Shogun X chef knife are a bit of a jumbled-up in terms of design. A western chef knife in general shape, but with the grind and hardness of a Japanese chef knife more commonly associated with the latter.

For the most part, however, these factors do not work in opposition to one another. I wouldn’t say that they work together. Still, they produce an excellent knife that is visually appealing and stands out from most other alternatives available in either the western or Japanese markets.

When used as a home kitchen knife, it works well, and if you get accustomed to thinking of it as a very light western chef knife rather than a hefty Japanese knife with a bit of odd balance, it becomes a very enjoyable knife to use. It’s an excellent knife to use if you don’t prefer it since it’s simply a fun-looking knife that slices well.

When compared to the more popular knives that professionals have historically used, it becomes a bit murkier. Still, this was intended to be a high-end knife for the home kitchen rather than an optimized blade for 8 hours of daily usage. I believe that the retention and development of this information are sufficient to manage a cook’s workweek. So said, I don’t think most experts would like the sensations they are experiencing.

Blade 

This is a very sharp knife. That’s something I’ve learned to expect from Dalstrong, and it’s something I can pretty well bank on. It has no trouble getting through tomato skin, and it makes onions feel smooth for the most part. It can even mince garlic quite finely with little effort.

I was anticipating a nice bite from this since it has a 12-degree edge on the blade, but I was surprised. I was concerned about the follow-through since the most frequent critique I hear about Dalstrong knives from individuals accustomed to high-end chef knives is that they wedge because the blade grind is too thick below the edge.

After everything is said, it turns out to be a legitimate critique, depending on your point of view.

Quality of Steel 

The blade of the Dalstrong Shogun X Series knife is composed of ultra-premium Japanese AUS-10V super steel, which is a rare and valuable resource.

Austenitic steel (AUS-10 steel) is very robust and rust-resistant. Furthermore, the steel exhibits superior performance in terms of edge retention and maintaining a sharper edge. In addition, AUS-10 steel has a Rockwell hardness of around 58-60 HRC on the Rockwell scale.

This is a highly refined stainless steel with a high proportion of carbon content, which results in higher hardness and edge retention than other stainless steel. The material contains between 0.95 and 1.1 percent carbon, 13-14.5 percent chromium, 0.5 percent manganese, 0.1 to.31 percent molybdenum,04 percent phosphorous, 49 percent nickel, 1 percent silicon, Three percent sulfur and.1 to.27 percent vanadium, according to the manufacturer’s specifications. Adding molybdenum makes it more challenging to sharpen steel. However, the presence of vanadium mitigates this disadvantage. The use of the thermal treatment also achieves a high Rockwell score.

Aside from that, the 66-67 layers of steel cladding give extraordinary strength and endurance. The knife’s cleanliness and lifespan are defined by its rust- and corrosion-resistant coating.

Along with using high-quality steel, Dalstrong knives are forged rather than stamped, beginning with a single bar of heat-treated steel molded into shape before being tempered, ground, and polished before being sharpened.

Stamped blades are cut from a thin steel sheet that has been forged. As a consequence, they are less difficult to mass-produce and less expensive. However, they are not as sturdy or well-balanced, and they do not have a bolster as the other options. The bolster is the point at which the handle meets the blade, and it helps give the knife its balance and heaviness.

Handle 

Its handle is made of military-grade G-10 Garolite, which is highly impervious to heat and moisture, resulting in a long-lasting, long-lasting resilience. When combined with an end cap, the ergonomic handle offers greater hand control and comfort while still providing stability for agile performance. The middle rivet is covered with a copper mosaic pin. The blade’s spine is smooth, allowing for a natural ‘pinch hold,’ and the design is created to provide excellent control, agility, and comfort while playing.

The use of epoxy glue allows the glass fiber to retain a variety of hues.

G-10 requires relatively little upkeep and is quite durable. This is because epoxy resin does not rust or corrode, and it does not grow brittle with time.

It is very resistant to heat, cold, and moisture; enhanced hand control and a non-slip grip ensure that the handle is extremely comfortable and long-lasting.

Maintenance

The use of a dishwasher to clean a specific device like this would shorten its useful life. In addition, dishwashers are notoriously abrasive, and their handles may be damaged as a result. Dishwasher detergents may also cause corrosion on the knife’s metallic components if they come into contact with them.

After each usage, be sure you thoroughly clean your knife. Clean with mild dish soap and rinse well after washing, then dry with a cotton towel before putting it away for storage.

Pros and Cons

Pros 

  • Food does not adhere to the blade because of its hammered Tsuchime finish, producing air spaces at the edge.
  • This super steel with a Rockwell hardness of 62+ and AUS-10V is very rust-resistant and has excellent edge retention.
  • Handling this knife feels so comfortable with its perfect balance; the full-tang blade provides maximum sturdiness.
  • Dalstrong offers the finest military-grade G-10 handle, which is more heat, moisture, and water-resistant than the competition.
  • Dalstrong guarantees complete customer satisfaction or a full refund of the purchase price. In addition, there is a lifetime guarantee against any manufacturing flaws that may occur.

Cons 

  • If you are seeking a genuine Japanese-made knife, this is not the knife for you. Even though these knives are manufactured in China, they are constructed by Japanese heritage and style. However, they are comparable in quality to Japanese knives while being significantly less expensive.
  • The Rockwell hardness of 62 or above indicates that the steel is more rigid and more brittle. As a result, utilize it with caution

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